Registration for Clean Tech 2017 is open

2017 Clean Tech Competition

Challenge your students to “Create a Greener Future”

Win up to $10,000!

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!

Registration is now open for the 2017 Clean Tech Competition, a global research and design challenge for 15-18 year old students. This year’s challenge is to “Create a Greener Future”.

This educational opportunity challenges students to develop innovative, clean technology solutions to real-world issues. Solutions may take on aspects of buildings, materials, and efficiency, indoor environmental quality and “sick buildings”, among other available topics. Student participants will gain experience with focused research, critical thinking, and the scientific process – making it a great project based learning opportunity.

There is no entry fee, and students can participate through school, extracurricular programs or, on their own. Total prizes awarded will be over $30,000 and the Finalist Event will be held on at Stony Brook University, New York!

There is no limit to the number of Teams per organization – so spread the word! Each stage of the competition is designed to be a rewarding process, and more student participation means inspiring more young scientists to help build a better future for our planet. We want students from Lane Tech College Prep in this year’s competition this year and for years to come.

Learn more and register at:

www.CleanTechCompetition.org

Contact administrator at CleanTech

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter! #CreateAGreenerFuture

“From young minds come fresh solutions”

Fifty for the Future Award

Nominations are open for 2016

The Illinois Technology Foundation (ITF) announces that the search for this year’s Fifty for the Future® for this year.

The ITF Fifty for the Future® mobilizes academia and industry to support students across Illinois universities who aspire to greatness in the field of technology. Faculty are invited to submit nominations for individual students or the student can self- nominate and have the nomination supported by faculty. Submitted students will be reviewed by a team of industry leaders, highlighting those who compel the technology industry forward.

In its 10th year, this event will honor Illinois students who have proven determination and foresight through their education and deeds in the application and development of technology. This annual competition culminates in an evening of celebration, highlighting the students themselves and the Foundation’s work with industry and academia in bringing real world experiences into the classroom to assure a steady stream of future technology workers and leaders for Illinois.

The awards are open to all students from high school juniors to graduate students that do not graduate before March 15, 2017.

Student Self Nomination

Students are encouraged to self nominate themselves. The process is simple and takes less than 15 minutes to complete the nomination form. Students are evaluated on characteristics like leadership, communications skills and community involvement. The Foundation believes strongly that LinkedIn is the resume of the future, therefore this years nominees are encouraged to build out their LinkedIn profile. We have provided a couple of tutorials below to assist you in that process. Once your nominations is complete it will be automatically forward to the faculty member identified on your application. Your instructor will certify that you are a student in good standing and worthy of this award. Your application and LinkedIn profile will be reviewed by a group of judges from the information technology community.

For more details and to self-nominate, go to http://illinoistechfoundation.org/itf-programs/fifty-for-the-future-celebration/.

NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Award – Deadline 11/7

NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Award

Award for AiC LogoThe NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing (AiC) honors high school women who are active and interested in computing and technology, and encourages them to pursue their passions. The multi-tiered structure includes recognition at the national and local levels, serving all 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and all U.S. overseas military bases.

The NCWIT Award for AiC is sponsored by Apple, Bank of America, Microsoft, Motorola Solutions Foundation, and Symantec.

Award for AiC recipients are chosen for their demonstrated interest and achievements in computing, proven leadership ability, academic performance, and plans for post‑secondary education.

Each local Affiliate Award program taps into the powerful network of NCWIT Alliance Members: teams from academia, non-profit organizations, startups, and corporations come together to build a community of support for young women passionate about computing.

Quote from Award RecipientApplications for the 2017 Award for Aspirations in Computing are now open.

Apply Now!

Eligibility

Any U.S. high school woman in grades 9 through 12 is eligible to apply, if she also meets all of the following criteria:

  • She attends a high school in the U.S. or is a U.S. citizen attending a high school in Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, or on a U.S. military base.
  • She has a U.S. Tax Identification or Social Security Number.
  • She is not an NCWIT employee and has no immediate family relationship with employees, extended staff, contractors or board members of NCWIT (including spouses, siblings, children, grandchildren and persons residing in the same household).

Applicants may reapply each year, but can only receive the National Award once; Affiliate Award programs allow repeat recipients at their own discretion.

Prizes

Each Affiliate Award winner receives recognition at an Award event, an engraved award for both her and her school, scholarship and internship opportunities, access to a peer network of technical young women in the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Community (sponsored by Bloomberg), and may receive various other prizes — computing resources, gadgets, sponsor-branded swag, and more.

Each National Award winner receives various prizes, cash, and a trip to Bank of America headquarters on March 3-5, 2017 for a celebration and networking with Bank of America employees.

Any prize that is classified as taxable income must be reported to the IRS. Taxes, where applicable, are the responsibility of the award winner.

Application Details

To apply, high school women must first register online. Click here to begin registration.

Then, students can apply online beginning September 1, 2016 and no later than 11:59 p.m. EST on November 7, 2016.

You may preview the application in English before you get started. You may also want to review the application how-to guide. Parents can review the approval how-to guide as well. For frequently asked questions about applying, approvals, and endorsements, please visit our FAQ page.

Additional Rules

Winners of the National Award are required to submit additional paperwork, including a notarized travel waiver and tax ID information. Failure by National Award recipients and/or her parent(s) or guardian(s) to return required paperwork, book travel within the allotted time, or attend the Bank of America celebration may result in forfeiture of all awards hereunder. To the extent required by law, Bank of America will report the value of the gift/reward/travel expenses to the IRS on Form 1099.

NCWIT may require additional hard-copy, notarized paperwork, at its discretion.

Note: Any Lane Tech CS teacher will gladly endorse and / or help you with your application. We will also offer at least one session to answer questions about the application.

Khan Academy Breakthrough Junior Challenge

We’re proud to partner with the Breakthrough Junior Challenge video contest again this year. Your student could win a $250,000 college scholarship!

To enter, your student should create a short video explaining a challenging concept in physics, mathematics, or the life sciences in an engaging, illuminating, and creative way.

Learn more and register today

Anyone ages 13 through 18 is eligible to enter. The winner’s teacher will receive a $50,000 prize, and their school will get a new $100,000 science lab. The winner will also be invited to an awards ceremony, where the prize will be presented in front of the superstars of science, Silicon Valley, and Hollywood.

Good luck, and we can’t wait to see your student’s video!

Onward,
Lizzie and the Khan Academy team

P.S.The deadline for submissions is October 10, 2016. Learn more and register today.

Innovation in Education Scholarship

Innovation in Education Scholarship

Innovation in Education Scholarship

Who is eligible to apply for the Innovation in Education Scholarship?

  • Must currently be enrolled as a high school or college/university student within the United States or Canada.
  • Must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 (or the equivalent).
  • Must be a citizen of, permanent resident of, or hold a valid student visa in the United States or Canada.
  • Must have designed an innovative project that makes a difference in the lives of others (This could be a website, series of blogs, an app, fundraising event, etc.)
  • Must submit an essay describing the goal of the particular project and provide supporting documentation.
  • The essay, idea, or creation must be the applicant’s original work.

How much is the Innovation in Education Scholarship worth?

The Innovation in Education Scholarship is worth $500!

When is the Innovation in Education Scholarship application due?

All submissions must be uploaded no later than 11:59 pm PST on the 20th of each month. The submission window closes starting the 21st and will reopen on the 1st at 8:00 a.m.

For the official rules, click here.

Best of luck to all who apply!

The post Innovation in Education Scholarship appeared first onScholarships360.

Fifty for the Future

The Illinois Technology Foundation (ITF) is pleased to announce that the search for this year’s Fifty for the Future® has begun.

The ITF Fifty for the Future® mobilizes academia and industry to support students across Illinois universities who aspire to greatness in the field of technology. Faculty are invited to submit nominations for individual students or the student can self- nominate and have the nomination supported by faculty. Submitted students will be reviewed by a team of industry leaders, highlighting those who compel the technology industry forward.

In its 9th year, this event will honor Illinois students who have proven determination and foresight through their education and deeds in the application and development of technology. This annual competition culminates in an evening of celebration, highlighting the students themselves and the Foundation’s work with industry and academia in bringing real world experiences into the classroom to assure a steady stream of future technology workers and leaders for Illinois.

The awards are open to all students from high school juniors to graduate students that do not graduate before March 15, 2016.

Student self-nominations and faculty nominations are open at http://illinoistechfoundation.org/itf-programs/fifty-for-the-future-celebration/

MakeSchools Student Competition

‘Make Impact’ with the MakeSchools Student Competition

Students around the nation are realizing new ways for impact and change through the Maker movement. To highlight this, students are invited to submit a project they’ve created that is ‘Making Impact.’ The best project will win an awesome Maker Kit from Dremel.

Visit http://make.xsead.cmu.edu/competition to find out more

Calling all Student Makers

How are you Making Impact on your campus, in your community or in the world with Making?

Students are invited submit one Maker-project prepared in the last year that addresses the theme above by May 31, 2015. Projects can be collaboratively or independently prepared. Each project should include a short video and a description of it’s development and outcomes.

Winners will be announced during the Week of Making in June 2015.

Prizes – Dremel Maker Package

The winning project will receive a Dremel Maker Package which includes a Dremel Idea Builder 3D Printer, Fortiflex Heavy Duty Flex Shaft tool, the 8050 Cordless Rotary Tool, the 4000 Corded Rotary Tool, a VersaTip Butane Tool, a Dremel VersaFlame Butane Tool and the Dremel Saw-Max MultiSaw!

Two runner up prizes (more awesome Dremel tools and products) will also be awarded.

Spread the Word

Send this email to students at your institution or share it on Twitter:

Make impact with the @makeschools and @dremel student competition – submit your work at http://make.xsead.cmu.edu/competition #make #Dremel3D

Dremel and Makers

Our thanks to Dremel for kindly sponsoring and supporting student makers and this competition.
Dremel has been fostering makers and doers for 82+ years and is a trusted mentor and educator in the ‘making’ process through Dremel Experts and various digital touch-points. Find out more about Dremel and Making at www.dremel.com and for more information on the Idea Builder 3D Printer please visit www.dremel3d.com

Google Code-In Contest

Introducing teens to open source software development with the Google Code-in contest

Back in 2010 Google realized that with the success of its Google Summer of Code program for university students there was a huge opportunity to reach even younger students and get them excited about software development in their early teens. Thus the Google Code-in contest was born. The 2014 contest will begin December 1st.

Google Code-in is a global, online contest designed for 13-17 year old pre-university students who are interested in learning about open source software development. Over the past four years, 1575 students from 78 countries have completed tasks in the contest. The contest allows teens to work with real open source projects such as Sahana Software Foundation (disaster relief software), Sugar Labs (software for children), Wikimedia, KDE and many others during the seven week contest. The opportunity to work on real software projects helps build the student’s skills as well as their confidence.

For their hard work students can earn a certificate of completion by completing one task, a t-shirt for completing three and a hooded sweatshirt if they are named as one the project’s five finalists. Finally, two grand prize winners are chosen by each of the open source projects and flown to Google’s Mountain View headquarters with a parent or legal guardian for a five day trip.

We hope students will continue to contribute to open source projects throughout their lives and help introduce others to the open source community thus putting more code out in the world for everyone to use.

Because software development requires many different skills, the open source projects create tasks for the students to work on in five categories: coding, documentation/training, quality assurance, outreach/research and user interface. While many of the tasks will involve using C++, C, HTML, Java, PHP, or Python, there are plenty of tasks for students new to software development—maybe they want to try their hand at documentation or perhaps they are artistically inclined and could help design a logo or redesign a web page. There are even tasks where students can create a screencast or a video describing how to use the software or introducing a new feature.

Realizing students can feel a bit intimidated jumping right into a software project they don’t know much about, participating projects assign mentors to each of the tasks so students can ask questions and receive guidance if they get stuck while trying to complete a task. This mentor interaction has proven to be a key part of the success of the program. Mentors are all active community members with the open source projects and are excited to help and to get new, young open source enthusiasts involved in their communities. Every year the #1 feedback we receive from mentors is that the seven weeks they spend working with these students is one of the most rewarding things they do all year. Mentors are not paid for their participation in the contest—instead they receive a t-shirt and a hearty thanks from Google. But time and again we hear that their main motivation for participating is helping students learn and bringing them into their communities.

Community involvement is one of the hallmarks of both Google Code-in and Google Summer of Code. Students have the opportunity to not only see the work they are doing become integrated into the software that thousands and sometimes millions of people will use but they also become part of that project’s open source community. When a student is welcomed into the open source community and becomes an active contributor they feel their work is appreciated. They can make new friends and are able to see the impact their work is having on the project. Ideally, students will continue to contribute to open source projects throughout their lives and help introduce others to the open source community thus putting more code out in the world for everyone to use.

Every year the grand prize winners come to Google as part of their grand prize trip and our team has had the opportunity to meet dozens of amazing students who have shared their stories with us. Since the contest is still relatively young (celebrating it’s 5th anniversary this year) most of the students are still in high school or university but the effect the contest has had on their lives is substantial.

Sushain Cherivirala, one of the Apertium project’s Google Code-in 2013 grand prize winners, recently wrote a blog post for the Google Open Source blog and had the following to say about his experience with the contest.

If I had to pick the single most educational experience of my life, it would be Google Code-in (GCI). I’ve completed MOOCson topics from Philosophy to Functional Programming, finished my high school’s computer science curriculum, taken a computer science internship and participated in countless programming contests. But I can claim with confidence that Google’s initiative to put high school students into real-world open source development environments is unparalleled in its influence on me.

Google Code-in has helped me not only advance my technological expertise but also, more importantly, exposed me to an environment that few students my age have the opportunity to benefit from.

Out of all the programming contests I’ve participated in, Google Code-in has offered the most authentic experience; there are no synthetic problems designed to test your coding ability, every line of code goes towards improving an open source organization’s software. Working with Apertium during GCI has afforded me a new perspective on software development, made me a strong proponent of open source software, helped me gain valuable experience that will undoubtedly help me in the future and convinced me to remain a lifetime contributor to open source.

Sushain’s experience is something that we have seen time and time again with our contest participants. We have had a number of students go on to become mentors for other students the year or two after they participated in Google Code-in (once they are 18) and many have continued to be active contributors to the open source projects they worked with during Google Code-in. And now that more of the students are turning 18 and eligible for the Google Summer of Code program this year alone we had 16 former Google Code-in students accepted for Google Summer of Code. We expect that number to rise as more of these teens enroll in universities.

Google Code-in 2014 begins December 1, 2014 at 9am PST. We hope to have even more students participate this year than ever before. For 2014, there will be 10-12 open source projects creating tasks for students to work on. For more information on the contest, including rules, FAQs, timeline, sample tasks and slide decks to share with students, please visit the contest site google-melange.com.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Code-in Program Manager

This entry was posted in Announcements by Lissa Clayborn. Bookmark the permalink.

Second annual picoCTF competition opening October 27

Carnegie Mellon University’s hacking team is designing and hosting the second annual picoCTF competition, a free online nationwide computer security event for middle and high school students. From October 27 2014 to November 7 2014, picoCTF ( http://picoctf.com ) will challenge students to learn and practice authentic hacking techniques in the context of a story-driven game created by Carnegie Mellon’s Entertainment Technology Center. The competition consists of a series of challenges where participants must reverse engineer, break, hack, decrypt, or do whatever it takes to solve the task. Students, with experience ranging anywhere from the somewhat computer savvy to well-versed programmers, will learn how to identify security vulnerabilities and perform real-world attacks.

By organizing a competition that presents computer science from this exciting and topical perspective, we hope to encourage students to become involved in the areas of computer science and computer security. Last year, nearly 2,000 teams of students across the country competed for $20,000 in prizes for both teams and schools. This year, we have more than $30,000 in prizes, as well as new tools designed to help teachers participate in picoCTF as a classroom activity.

For more information on the competition, as well as early registration, please visit our website at https://picoctf.com . You can also check out last year’s competition at https://2013.picoctf.com .

We encourage you to contact us with any questions you may have regarding the competition at educator.

The ITF Fifty for the Future

Nominations Now Open

The Illinois Technology Foundation (ITF) is pleased to announce that the search for this year’s Fifty for the Future® has begun.

The ITF Fifty for the Future® mobilizes academia and industry to support students across Illinois universities who aspire to greatness in the field of technology. Faculty are invited to submit nominations for individual students or the student can self- nominate and have the nomination supported by faculty. Submitted students will be reviewed by a team of industry leaders, highlighting those who compel the technology industry forward.

In its 8th year, this event will honor Illinois students who have proven determination and foresight through their education and deeds in the application and development of technology. This annual competition culminates in an evening of celebration, highlighting the students themselves and the Foundation’s work with industry and academia in bringing real world experiences into the classroom to assure a steady stream of future technology workers and leaders for Illinois.

The awards are open to all students from high school juniors to graduate students that do not graduate before December 1, 2014.

The nomination process will remain open until October 1, 2014. Students can Self-Apply and learn more here.